THE MYSTERIES OF UKOK PRINCESS

SHAMANIC EXPEDITION TO ALTAI AUGUST 1st-7th, 2018

Registration is open until June 1st, 2018

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COME TO HEAR THE CALL OF THE SPIRITS AND ANCESTORS! SAVE THE PLANET, YOURSELF AND YOUR CLAN!

Help those who you love to join us and get to the Place of Power!

Invite a friend, a relative, or any person that you want to help and your karma will become cleansed and get lighter!

God helps those who help others.

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Day of arrival

Day of arrival

Flight to Gorno-Altaisk or Barnaul. Guests pick-ups (usually guests arrive with the morning flight). Transfer to Gorno-Altaisk. Spend the night at the campsite, house or hotel near Gorno-Altaisk.

Day 1

Day 1

A bus will pick us up after breakfast and take us to Gorno-Altaisk for a museum tour from 10am-12pm (ethnographical exhibit, animal exhibit). Receiving blessings from the Altai Princess.

12pm bus departs to  campsite. There will be snacks in the bus to save time in transit. During the bus ride we will learn about Shamanism and the Altai region.

Arrival to campsite around 2pm. Unload bus. Lunch.

After lunch, around 3:30pm, people have time to set up camp in the campsite.

4:30 pm — Massage, yoga, movement exercises on the camp territory. Getting to know the campsite.

7pm – 8pm — Ceremonial dinner.

8pm – 10pm — Mystical presentation/opening ceremony of the Altai Shamanic Expedition with a bonfire, Shamanic drums, costumes and traditions. Greeting the Spirits of Altai. Ritual of unification with spirits of the region and receiving blessings for the expedition.

Day 2

Day 2

7am-10am — Shamanic sauna (optional)

7am-9am — Morning exercises for a healthy life style (stretching, running, yoga, massage).

9am-10am — People who didn’t go to the sauna get ready for the lesson

10am-11am — Breakfast

11am-1pm — Lesson

1pm-1:45pm — Lunch

2pm — Buses depart to Verblud Mountain for hike.

The hiking trail that leads up to the summit begins right at the outskirts of the village. The mountain’s summit is 927 meters above sea level. The ascend to the summit is about 400 meters, so it’s important to have appropriate athletic footwear such as sneakers. Do not plan to climb in flip-flops or poorly-fitting shoes. The climb takes about 1.5 hours.

From the summit of Verblud Mountain, you can see the entire village. In the middle of it, you can see the Beshpek Mountain, which is covered in trees and rises like a green tower. The calm azure waters of the reservoir can be seen at the base of the Beshpek Mountain. To the left you can clearly see the Sartakpai Gates and the narrow ravine of a channel in the Katun River. The Katun River bends into a semi-circle right before the Sartakpai Gates and forms a mount covered in forest. Behind the mount, like a crown, the peaks of the Mramor Mountain can be seen. It is located on the left bank of the Katun River.

Impressive scenic views of the Katun Valley can be seen from the Verblud Mountain, especially on a clear day. The Katun River makes two bends rights across from Verblud Mountain. Each bend rotates almost at 180 degrees from each other and the two bends looks like a dollar sign.

Geological maps mark the Verblud Mountain’s right (Southern) summit to be 927 meters above sea level. It is a little bit taller than the mountain’s Northern summit and from it you can experience beautiful views. The right summit is also less forested than the left and on there is a mast situated on the clearing. Upon it, a Russian flag waves and signifies that this is the mountain’s highest point.

http://www.turistka.ru/altai/info.php?ob=1177

4pm-6pm — Ceremonies on Verblud Mountain

6pm — Descent from the mountain

8pm — Dinner at camp

8pm — Evening lessons

Day 3

Day 3

7am-10am — Shamanic sauna (optional)

7am-9am — Morning exercises for a healthy life style (stretching, running, yoga, massage).

10am — Breakfast

11am-1pm — Lesson at camp

1pm-1:45pm — Lunch

2pm — Hike to Patmos Island

The Patmos Island on Katun River received its name from a Greek island by the same name where St. John the Evangelist used to pray. Patmos Island was sanctified by bishop Parfeny in 1855 who personally engraved a stone with the following inscription: “On August 9th, 1855, in remembrance of St. Matthew the Apostle, this island was consecrated in the glory of the Consubstantial and Life-Giving Trinity in honor of St. John the Baptist and Forerunner.” In 1849, the first church, the Church of St. John the Theologian was built, coinciding with the establishment of the Altai Mission of the local settlement. The church wasn’t built on the island, but rather in the place where the Middle School building is currently located. In 1875, the iconostasis was transferred to a new church and the old church remained as housing for missionaries. In 1895, the old church was re-consecrated as a house of prayer, in honor of the “Joy for All Who Sorrow” Icon of the Mother of God.

In 1914, a church was built for the “Joy for All Who Sorrow” Icon of the Mother of God. It was consecrated by the church hierarch, Makary, Metropolitan of Moscow and Kolomna. The church is located in the center of the village not far from the train station. In 1915, The old Church of St. John the Theologian was relocated to Patmos Island. Its consecration was performed by Bishop Innokenty of Biysk on August 9th, 1915, exactly 60 years after the island itself was consecrated by Bishop Parfeny. In the 1920s the church and the bridge that led to the island were completely destroyed. Only after 80 years, were the sacred buildings restored by missionaries Viktor Nicholaevich Pavlov and his wife, who came there from Moscow. First they built a hanging bridge to Patmos over the Katun River. Then, by the year 2000, they restored the Church of St. John the Theologian as an exact copy of the original wooden church. On January 10th, 2001, the church was consecrated by Bishop Antony of Barnaul and Altai in the name of John the Theologian and it was given to the Barnaul Znamensky Convent…

Currently, the Church of St. John the Theologian on Patmos is an active skete of the convent and services are held there regularly. It is accessible for visitation by tourists. The island can be accessed by the hanging bridge over the Katun River. There is an ecclesiastical shop located right before the bridge. From the bridge, you can see the image of the Mother of God carved onto the mountain side. This was done by the Barnaul Znamensky Covent’s sculptress Felofeya. As soon as you step onto the island, you can see, to the left of the trail, an icon carved into the cliff’s alcove, depicting a scene from the Bible — The Adoration of the Magi to the Infant in Bethlehem.

Dinner at camp after excursion to Patmos.

8pm — Evening lessons by the fire

Day 4

Day 4

7am-10am — Shamanic sauna (optional)

7am-9am — Morning exercises for a healthy life style (stretching, running, yoga, massage).

10am — Breakfast

11:30am — Expedition. Lunch will be in the bus (snacks).

First we will travel by bus, then on foot. We will look at ancient petroglyphs, then we will visit a waterfall and return to camp after 2pm.

Dinner at camp

The Kuyus Grotto is one of the most famous locations of petroglyphs in mid-Katun River. It is located in region of the Altai Mountains, 5km from the Kuyus village, on the right bank of the Katun River. It is on the way to the Beltertuyuk Waterfall and it’s easy to get to by car in dry weather.

There are two places that have the largest clusters of petroglyphs. Both can easily be seen from the trail on two separate cliffs (buttes) that are enclosed behind fences about 50m apart from each other. One of the buttes is called the Kuyus Grotto. There are also some rock paintings scattered on boulders throughout the Kizik-Telan and on a stele in front of the Kuyus Grotto. The name “Kuyus Grottos” is somewhat inaccurate. The area is more of a cliff recess, a rock cleft, covered in “a desert tan”— a dark shiny crust that has been polished by water flow.

The petroglyphs depict deer, moose, goats, fantastical predators, anthropomorphic figures. Specialists have counted around 200 different images. The majority of petroglyphs can be dated to the Bronze Age, but there are also some ancient ones that were created by man in the Neolithic Era. One such ancient petroglyph is an 1.5 meter elk carved into the contour of the upper mountain range from the Southern side of the Grotto. There is also a procession of elk depicted on the inner side of an alcove. The animals are depicted in a realistic style, which is a rare occurrence for the petroglyphs of the Altai region. This style is characteristic of the Neolithic Era (6,000-8,000 years ago) and were executed with stone instruments. These images are considered to be some of the most ancient ones in the Altai Mountains, along with the elk drawings at Kalbak-Tash, which are similar to the Kuyus Grotto drawings’ style, technique and large size. Other drawings, like the ones of fantastical animals that combine various elements from different animals in them, are dated to the early Bronze Age (to the Afanasevo culture).

The stele in front of the Kuyus Grotto depicts cloven-footed animals stacked in tiers and fashioned in the technique of chiseled-contour. One of the figures (the 4th from the top down) looks like a combination of a bull and a moose. Such syncretic figures are common to the Early Bronze Age. Other figures resemble elk and Siberian stags. All of the figures are facing the right, looking at a very schematic image of an anthropomorphic being that resembles a woman. The female is very rarely depicted in the Altai and Central Asian petroglyphs. There is another female figure depicted in a cave drawing above the Grotto. A similar composition depicting the ancient theme of “human-animal” can be found nearby, by the fountainhead of the Karban stream. Some researchers believe that the image depicts a woman-shaman in ceremony. Others think that this is the image of a mythical Mother-progenitor. Scientists date this petroglyph to the Eneolithic Era (Early Bronze Age).

The Kuyus Grotto is thought to have been a sanctuary for nomadic tribes over a period of a couple thousand years. Excavations at the base of the Kuyus Grotto reveals three cultural periods. Large flint tools, characteristic of the Neolithic Era, were discovered on the lower level. In the middle, pieces of ceramic pottery and smaller flint tools were found. And on the top tier, archeologists found pieces of pottery and a broken iron chisel-like tool.

There are dozens of ancient burial grounds located between the petroglyphs and the river. They are called the “KizikTelan 2” and are dated to the Early Scythian Period.

The Beltertuyuk Waterfall is located 8km outside of the Kuyus village in region of the Altai Republic. The waterfall has many other names: Beltirek, Beltireksky, Beltiryeck, Batir-Oek. The Beltertuyuk Waterfall has been given a natural monument of the Altai Republic status.

The road to the waterfall passes through the Kuyus village, then over a small ford crossing and past a rock mound. Then the mountain trail leads to a rocky clearing in front of the waterfall. Some areas of the road are in poor condition and if traveling by car, proceed with caution, or leave the car in a safe spot and travel the remainder of the way to the waterfall by foot.

The Beltertuyuk Stream (a tributary into the Katun River) in its estuary creates two impressive waterfalls, 29m and 11m in height. On the cliff near the waterfall some drawings can be seen chiseled into the rock surface in fine point.

Day 5

Day 5

7am-10am — Shamanic sauna (optional)

7am-9am — Morning exercises for a healthy life style (stretching, running, yoga, massage).

10am — Breakfast

11:30am — Expedition. Lunch will be in the bus (snacks).

First we will travel by bus, then on foot. We will look at ancient petroglyphs, then we will visit a waterfall and return to camp after 2pm.

Dinner at camp

The Kuyus Grotto is one of the most famous locations of petroglyphs in mid-Katun River. It is located in the region of the Altai Mountains, 5km from the Kuyus village, on the right bank of the Katun River. It is on the way to the Beltertuyuk Waterfall and it’s easy to get to by car in dry weather.

There are two places that have the largest clusters of petroglyphs. Both can easily be seen from the trail on two separate cliffs (buttes) that are enclosed behind fences about 50m apart from each other. One of the buttes is called the Kuyus Grotto. There are also some rock paintings scattered on boulders throughout the Kizik-Telan and on a stele in front of the Kuyus Grotto. The name “Kuyus Grottos” is somewhat inaccurate. The area is more of a cliff recess, a rock cleft, covered in “a desert tan”— a dark shiny crust that has been polished by water flow.

The petroglyphs depict deer, moose, goats, fantastical predators, anthropomorphic figures. Specialists have counted around 200 different images. The majority of petroglyphs can be dated to the Bronze Age, but there are also some ancient ones that were created by man in the Neolithic Era. One such ancient petroglyph is an 1.5 meter elk carved into the contour of the upper mountain range from the Southern side of the Grotto. There is also a procession of elk depicted on the inner side of an alcove. The animals are depicted in a realistic style, which is a rare occurrence for the petroglyphs of the Altai region. This style is characteristic of the Neolithic Era (6,000-8,000 years ago) and were executed with stone instruments. These images are considered to be some of the most ancient ones in the Altai Mountains, along with the elk drawings at Kalbak-Tash, which are similar to the Kuyus Grotto drawings’ style, technique and large size. Other drawings, like the ones of fantastical animals that combine various elements from different animals in them, are dated to the early Bronze Age (to the Afanasevo culture).

The stele in front of the Kuyus Grotto depicts cloven-footed animals stacked in tiers and fashioned in the technique of chiseled-contour. One of the figures (the 4th from the top down) looks like a combination of a bull and a moose. Such syncretic figures are common to the Early Bronze Age. Other figures resemble elk and Siberian stags. All of the figures are facing the right, looking at a very schematic image of an anthropomorphic being that resembles a woman. The female is very rarely depicted in the Altai and Central Asian petroglyphs. There is another female figure depicted in a cave drawing above the Grotto. A similar composition depicting the ancient theme of “human-animal” can be found nearby, by the fountainhead of the Karban stream. Some researchers believe that the image depicts a woman-shaman in ceremony. Others think that this is the image of a mythical Mother-progenitor. Scientists date this petroglyph to the Eneolithic Era (Early Bronze Age).

The Kuyus Grotto is thought to have been a sanctuary for nomadic tribes over a period of a couple thousand years. Excavations at the base of the Kuyus Grotto reveals three cultural periods. Large flint tools, characteristic of the Neolithic Era, were discovered on the lower level. In the middle, pieces of ceramic pottery and smaller flint tools were found. And on the top tier, archeologists found pieces of pottery and a broken iron chisel-like tool.

There are dozens of ancient burial grounds located between the petroglyphs and the river. They are called the “KizikTelan 2” and are dated to the Early Scythian Period.

The Beltertuyuk Waterfall is located 8km outside of the Kuyus village in the region of the Altai Republic. The waterfall has many other names: Beltirek, Beltireksky, Beltiryeck, Batir-Oek. The Beltertuyuk Waterfall has been given a natural monument of the Altai Republic status.

The road to the waterfall passes through the Kuyus village, then over a small ford crossing and past a rock mound. Then the mountain trail leads to a rocky clearing in front of the waterfall. Some areas of the road are in poor condition and if traveling by car, proceed with caution, or leave the car in a safe spot and travel the remainder of the way to the waterfall by foot.

The Beltertuyuk Stream (a tributary into the Katun River) in its estuary creates two impressive waterfalls, 29m and 11m in height. On the cliff near the waterfall some drawings can be seen chiseled into the rock surface in fine point.

Day 6

Day 6

This day is dedicated to celebrating the Great White Shaman’s birthday.

On this day, there will be an Orphic concert, during which every participant will be able to access their talents and to help the world through creativity. Unfortunately, in the modern world, creative energy is used predominantly for multiplying material wealth. We have lost the higher meaning of creative, Orphic art.

During this concert, with the influence of the Great White Shaman’s energy, each participant will be able to feel a deep inner transformation of their abilities and access their superpowers (voice, hearing, eloquence, acting abilities). After this, the participants, having received special powers, will be able to help the whole world. The people who will be chosen by the Spirit of Altai will undergo a special initiation ritual and will receive the blessings of the Spirit of Altai to carry creative energy into the world, and to help people by using the creative, Orphic energy.

On this day, there will be a grand shamanic ritual next to the fire. Through this ritual we will connect with the fate of the Great White Shaman.

Besides this, people will receive their unique shamanic personal recommendation about their mission in the world. They will find out how their fate is intertwined with the fate of the Great White Shaman and also, about how theirs and their clan’s fate, and even their country’s fate can change through the unification with the fate of the Great White Shaman.

Day 7(last day)

Day 7(last day)

On this day, we will perform a wonderful oracle ritual.

Through this Spirit of Altai divination ritual, each participant will find out the specific ways in which he/she can help their country, what rituals to reform and how to save their country and preserve the planet for our descendants.

On this day, a ceremony dedicated to the end of the expedition will be performed. We will also say goodbye to Princess Ukok and thank the spirits of Altai for their generous gifts.

During the course of the expedition, participants will have stored up a large amount of energy potential. For this reason, on the last day, we will conduct a special ritual for the fulfillment of people’s innermost desires.

How it was:

SHAMAN’S WORLD – MYSTERIES OF UKOK PRINCESS

“In Southern Altai, on the alpine Ukok Plateau, which rises up 3 km above sea level and has long been considered to be a sacred territory, near the foothills of the great Tabin-Bogdo-Ola mountains, exists a mountainous region called the “Second Layer of Heaven”.

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